Thunder 1929

Thunder_film[1]

This long lost, silent picture has a family connection. Starring Lon Chaney (The Man of a Thousand Faces), it was filmed on the Chicago & North Western Railroad near Green Bay, Wisconsin.  My namesake Great-Grandfather, Lindsay “Len” Pruner was a C&NW trainmaster and engineer who worked with Lon Chaney as a technical advisor.

Lon Chaney on IMDb
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0151606/

See what IMDb has to say about “Thunder – 1929”
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0020498/

Unfortunately, Thunder 1929 is one of Lon Chaney’s “lost” movies with only a few minutes of footage surviving. Even worse,  Lon Chaney passed away shortly thereafter due to “too much smoking”. It was his last silent film.

“Thunder on the C&NW” was an article in the Summer 1983 issue of North Western Lines magazine written by my father, Philip B. Korst  about the making of this movie. It is available for purchase on CD from the C&NW Historical Society.
http://www.cnwhs.org/shopping/product_info.php?products_id=224

Thunder_film2[1]

Lon Chaney (left) shakes Lindsay Pruner’s hand in front of a C&NW locomotive

Thunder_film3[1]

Lon Chaney (center) and my Great-Grandfather Pruner (far left)

If you have ANY information about this movie, please contact me at:
Lindsay.Korst@gmail.com.

Advertisements

About Lindsay Korst

Webmaster, Blogmaster, Ferroequinologist - Lindsay Korst works part-time for a nationwide home improvement center after a 20+ year career supporting computer users. A resident of the Seattle area since 1976, he has had a life-long interest in railroads, particularly those in the Pacific Northwest. He is an enthusiastic participant in the Great Northern Railway Historical Society. He and his wife reside in Redmond, Washington.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Thunder 1929

  1. Paul C. says:

    Nice article, I didn’t know many of the details, especially the information about your great-grandfather. I’ll consider ordering the article.

    It’s remarkable that the only two know surviving fragments of the film both came to light in the late 1990s, from independent sources. Perhaps someday a print will surface, but it becomes less likely with each passing year.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s